How to follow Rosetta’s grand finale

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Rosetta is set to complete its historic mission in a controlled descent to the surface of its comet on 30 September, with the end of mission confirmation predicted to be within 20 minutes of 11:20 GMT (13:20 CEST). Details of how, when and where to follow the key moments online, starting with a review of the mission’s impressive haul of science highlights on 29 September, can be found below:

29 September 12:30–15:30 GMT / 14:30–17:30 CEST, science highlights
Tune in to the livestream viewer at rosetta.esa.int, https://new.livestream.com/ESA/rosettagrandfinale or ESA’s Facebook page on 29 September for dedicated talks celebrating …read more

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Post-earthquake Kumamoto in Google Earth 3D

In April this year the city of Kumamoto, Japan, suffered a series of large earthquakes. Google managed to capture aerial imagery of the city essentially during the event, after the first major event but before the largest shock and then captured another set of imagery from after the event. We had a look at what damage could be seen in the imagery including a large number of landslides, collapsed buildings and a derailed train. From the overhead imagery it wasn’t easy to see the extent of the damage to buildings even though we knew, based on ground level imagery, …read more

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Living with a comet: A ROSINA team perspective

Three ROSINA PhD students trying to wake up Rosetta. Image courtesy K. Altwegg

Three ROSINA PhD students trying to wake up Rosetta. Image courtesy K. Altwegg

Rosetta’s ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) suite of instruments have made plenty of big headlines over the last two years, with the surprising discovery of molecular oxygen and nitrogen and the ‘flavour’ of the comet’s water being different to Earth’s among them. ROSINA principal investigator Kathrin Altwegg and colleagues reflect on the highs and lows of the 40-strong team of scientists and technicians since Rosetta woke up from deep space hibernation on 20 January 2014.

Celebrating Rosetta’s wake up at the University of …read more

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